some bondage safety tips

this is a LOT more dangerous than most people realize and yes, potentially lethal. Esp if you are doing more than tying your lover’s hands and having sex with them.

General tips

  • never leave the tied person alone
  • always have a QUICK way out (ie safety scissors, shears, knife)
  • communication and trust are key
  • your health, fitness (not necessarily about weight) must be good esp for rigging

ask your doctor if you’re healthy enough for suspension bondage
If you don’t feel you can be “out” to your doctor, you might ask whether you are healthy enough for strenuous yoga involving inversion

  • pressure points

There are various points around the body where nerves and blood vessels come very close to the surface. Sometimes known as pressure points, they are found on the soft parts of joints. Tie above or below them and in particular stay away from the inside of the elbow, the backs of knees, and the inner biceps and thighs.

http://www.remedialropes.com/basic-bondage-safety/i…

key issues : personal safety, circulation, nerve damage

  • circulation

Signs of circulation problems include temperature change (cooling of the limb), color change, and numbness.
These signs and symptoms generally occur SLOWLY.
In isolation, circulation can be decreased for some time before tissue damage begins

  • nerve damage

Nerve damage is much more of a concern for bondage than decreased circulation (though the two can and do happen concurrently).
Danger signs for nerve damage include pain (generally described as sharp/shooting), weakness, tightness, stress, tingling, and numbness.
These generally occur QUICKLY, sometimes instantly, and should be acted on immediately to prevent or minimize long term damage.
Nerve damage can occur either by stretching of the nerve (ex: over-extending the arms over the head for extended periods of time) or by compression(ex:ex: rope pressing tightly up against the armpit)/shearing force (ex: tight rope pulling across the upper arm). Shearing force refers to parallel surfaces sliding past one another and is particularly problematic for your nerves—if you ever had a gradeschool classmate do a “snake bite” on your arm, you have some idea of what this type of force feels like.
The interplay of these five basic factors determine whether a bondage nerve injury happens and how severe it is:
Individual differences in nerve vulnerability [31] (some people seem to have bombproof nerves, some people seem to get nerve damage if you look at them funny)
Anatomical location (where on the body you are tying. Some locations are higher risk than others. For example, joints and upper arms are generally higher risk areas, as compared to the thighs or ankles [31].)
Duration of compression. Nerve damage happens in stages—removing bondage at the first signs of injury can keep a minor injury from becoming a major one [1].
Severity of compression/amount of shearing force [1]. The increased severity of compression and risk of shearing is part of what makes suspension bondage generally higher risk than floor work.
Stretch/stress positioning. This also has a lot of individual variance. Keep in mind that stretching/stress positioning may also make nerves more vulnerable to compression.
As a general rule: The more force and the longer the time, the greater the damage will be. “Mechanisms of nerve injury include direct pressure, repetitive microtrauma, and stretch- or compression-induced ischemia. The degree of injury is related to the severity and extent (time) of compression.” [1]
Most incidents of nerve damage involve many (if not all) of these 5 factors.
It’s possible for nerve damage to occur without any warning/symptoms at all, and even with an experienced top who does “everything right.” There is a lot of evidence that nerve damage is cumulative [1]

http://www.restrainedelegance.com/bondagesafety.php…

  • Basic Rope Safety

If you want to start rope tying, buy a book (eg Bondage for Sex by Chanta Rose, as seen on this site). Get some idea of what is safe to do and what isn’t. But here are a few starting pointers.

  • Not The Neck

Never, ever tie anything around someone’s neck or across the front of their neck or in a way which can tighten or pull on the neck. This is extremely dangerous.
Consider what could happen if the submissive fell, slipped or fainted. Could anything in the neck or shoulder area slip, or pull, or tighten? Even something as simple as a collar chained to a fixed point could be lethal if the submissive were to faint and fall. Make sure it couldn’t catch or pull and make sure that any fastening rope or chain is PLENTY long enough that she could fall to the floor and still have no tension on the neck area.

  • Avoid Pressure Points

Avoid areas where nerves and veins run close to the skin surface. Tie above and below joints rather than on the joint. Tie wrists facing together rather than facing apart (so the rope doesn’t press directly on the veins on the inside of the wrist). Avoid the inner biceps, elbow, inner thighs and backs of the knees.

  • Tie Off Knots

Learn to tie the basic bondage knot which prevents the rope slipping or tightening. We will be adding more tutorial material on this shortly, but Chanta’s Book is the best place to start.

  • Falling Over

The most common cause of injury in bondage is… falling over. Take precautions, or just start off on the floor.

  • Staying In Too Long

Some positions are inherently stressful. If tied elbows together behind the back, you WILL lose feeling in your hands. It is just a question of whether it takes 30 seconds or 30 minutes. Losing feeling is not immediately dangerous, but it could be a sign of losing circulation or pressure on nerves which can cause lasting injury. Numbness can mean you don’t feel ropes cutting in and doing yet more damage.
So… don’t leave your submissive in there too long. If something is turning blue, get her out. If she can’t feel her fingertips, let her out. If she’s got pins and needles start getting her out now, before you need to cut her out in a few minutes’ time.

  • Start Simple

Don’t launch straight into a complicated rope suspension. Learn to tie basic stuff first. Suspensions bring a whole raft of new safety issues, and you shouldn’t try them until you can tie the simple stuff safely first.

  • Not too tight

A very common mistake is to tie the ropes too tight. The “one finger” test is a good start- make sure you can slip a finger under the rope. If tied correctly with ropes in the right places this will still be just as effective in tying up your submisisve, but she will be able to hold it for longer and in much greater safety.

  • Rope Burn and Whipping Ends

Be careful not to run rope too fast over skin- you can cause rope burn. And be careful not to poke someone in the eye as the end of a rope gets whipped around. These problems are more likely when untying than when tying up, so be extra careful of them then.

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